Online dating warwickshire

19-Feb-2018 21:42

From the early 19th century, however, the burial of the dead in graveyards (burial grounds within churchyards) began to fall out of favour.

This was due to rapid population growth in the early stages of the Industrial Revolution, continued outbreaks of infectious disease near graveyards, and the increasingly restricted space in graveyards for new interment.

Warstone Lane Cemetery Warstone Lane Cemetery, alongside the Jewellery Quarter in the Hockley district of Birmingham, was opened in 1848.

parent or other relative), and officiating minister.The county previously included the cities of Birmingham, Coventry, and Solihull.These records are not intended to be a comprehensive collection of all the burials in Warwickshire.A significant number of the records were transcribed by Findmypast using the original burial registers found at the Warwickshire County Record Office.Other records were created by the Rugby Family History Group, the Birmingham and Midland Society for Genealogy & Heraldry, Family Search, and Pam Batstone and Mary Williams.

parent or other relative), and officiating minister.

The county previously included the cities of Birmingham, Coventry, and Solihull.

These records are not intended to be a comprehensive collection of all the burials in Warwickshire.

A significant number of the records were transcribed by Findmypast using the original burial registers found at the Warwickshire County Record Office.

Other records were created by the Rugby Family History Group, the Birmingham and Midland Society for Genealogy & Heraldry, Family Search, and Pam Batstone and Mary Williams.

Warwickshire burials includes the interment registers from four Birmingham cemeteries transcribed by the Birmingham and Midland Society for Genealogy & Heraldry (BMSGH).